Iran: IAEA inspectors must receive clearance from Iranian intelligence

Iran DFM claims UN inspectors must receive clearance from Iranian intelligence or will be barred from entry; White House claims it is “comfortable” with IAEA inspection abilities; Parchin nuclear site to be inspected by Iranian experts following sideline deal made before nuclear deal

Araqchi with IAEA chief Yukiya Amano

Araqchi with IAEA chief Yukiya Amano

Iran’s Deputy Foreign Minister, Abbas Araqchi clarified that any inspector of nuclear sites in Iran must receive approval following clearance from Iran’s intelligence agency. If approval is not given to an inspector of the United Nation’s International Agency for Atomic Energy (IAEA), they will be barred from entry to Iran.

According to Iranian media, Araqchi claims that the approval is sanctioned by the nuclear deal made between Iran and world powers.

Meanwhile in Washington, the White House expressed certainty in the IAEA’s abilities, National Security Council Spokesman Ned Price stating on Wednesday evening that “we are confident in the agency’s technical plans for investigating the possible military dimensions of Iran’s former program, issues that in some cases date back more than a decade… Just as importantly, the IAEA is comfortable with arrangements, which are unique to the agency’s investigation of Iran’s historical activities. When it comes to monitoring Iran’s behavior going forward, the IAEA has separately developed the most robust inspection regime ever peacefully negotiated to ensure Iran’s current program remains exclusively peaceful, the overarching objective of the JCPOA. Beyond that, we are not going to comment on a purported draft IAEA document.”

Iran will however inspect one of its own nuclear sites, Parchin. An agreement on inspections of Iran’s Parchin nuclear site was made separately between the IAEA and Iran before the nuclear deal, and allows for Iranian experts to inspect the Iranian nuclear site. Access to the documented agreement is not permitted, according to IAEA chief Yukiya Amano, as it confidential.

US officials were quick to deny claims that the “side deal” holds any weight, US Secretary of State John Kerry reportedly claiming that the arrangement is like “any other routine arrangement.”

According to reports, Iran will provide video and photos of the Parchin site to the IAEA, proving no weapons construction. Additionally, the “activities will be carried out using Iran’s authenticated equipment consistent with technical specifications provided by the agency,” and “will ensure the technical authenticity” of the inspection.